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  • Kunal Sinha

Zero to One: Guy Kawasaki

Guy Kawasaki has been a mentor for life for me. In my journey from zero to one I learnt key lessons from Guy which I would like to summarize

1. Make meaning not money: When we want to start a startup our focus should be on making meaning, the money will follow once we have made meaning.


2. Be a great listener: The art of networking lies in listening not in speaking, we as founders love to talk about our ideas, instead of talking we should focus on listening. Keep it short and simple


3. Ask simple questions: What if there was a better way for searching information, this was the question google asked, What if there was a better way to connect people, this was the question Mark Zuckerberg asked. Great products do simple things.


4. Where should I start: Passion & Expertise & Market Opportunity. When all three intersect then you can start a firm.


5. Ideas are the easiest part of entrepreneurship: We all think that startup or entrepreneurship requires one to think of best ideas, idea is first step practical value lies in execution.


6. Pitch vs Prototype: Focus on building prototype and testing in real world rather than focusing on building ppt. Focus on being an executioner rather than an ideator.


7. Viable vs scalable: According to Guy the biggest mistake entrepreneurs make is scaling too fast, the first step is to make a product that users love, first lets make a business viable let 100 people like it then lets think of scaling.


8. Hiring complementary people: For any business to survive one must hire people who are different who can bring different point of view. Entrepreneurs make biggest mistake of hiring mirror images.


9. Practice: When it comes to pitching practice it day in and day out. As a founder one is always pitching so keep practicing till you are able to make it crisp.


10. 10-20-30 rule: Human mind can remember 10 points at a go, so while presenting focus on 10 slides, that can be given in 20 minutes and 30 size font.

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